I work for Automattic, mostly doing user experience on WordPress.

Should we send site admins an email when it's time to update WordPress? (Poll Closed)

  • Yes, that would be awesome!
    34%
    461 votes

     
  • No way, that would be annoying.
    10%
    141 votes

     
  • Maybe, but I'd want a setting to turn it on or off.
    55%
    759 votes

     
  • I can't decide; I'll trust the core team's judgment!
    1%
    14 votes

     

Posted 4 years ago.

44 Comments

  • Keith Kirkendall - 4 years ago

    yes, please send updates

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  • Mecandes - 4 years ago

    E-mail would be nice... but would it be possible to differentiate between security updates and smaller fixes or patches? I'd want to know when there are critical security flaws that need immediate attention, but am less worried about the smaller routine updates, eh?

  • jebb - 4 years ago

    i have changed my mind. i want it to send me and email, but - only as a none-default option.

  • Laura - 4 years ago

    I don't read most of my email any more. It would be missed in all the clutter.

  • Darrell - 4 years ago

    If it does send a email it can be part of the cron from the wordpress install itself, but that would be a lot of checking everytime the site is visited. I think there are probably too many tasks happening already. If the wordpress servers check your email to send you a update, or your install sends your email to wordpress, i think that might have some privacy concerns. You may not realize and your information gets sent out. This should not be default.

  • EricaS - 4 years ago

    This would be awesome to have. I currently keep track of Wordpress via RSS to find out if there are any updates. It would be nice to have an install notify you itself, especially if you're behind on updates.

  • ravi - 4 years ago

    I refuse to respond to any poll that does not have a "Meh" option. The lack of this choice, I contend, leaves out the opinion of the majority.

  • albert diones - 4 years ago

    for critical and major updates, may help those that doesn't visit the wp-admin often. And it isn't that intruding I guess.

  • Chris - 4 years ago

    I already have this with the Update Notifier plugin, and I love it. This should be a canonical plugin, IMHO.

  • adamyonk - 4 years ago

    It would absolutely have to be a setting that can be turned on or off and it would be nice if there were other options for contact (email, IM, twitter DM, etc..)

  • MarkRH - 4 years ago

    I voted the maybe option if there's a way to turn it on/off. I'm in my admin panel just about everyday so tend to notice an update is available pretty quick. Think I check my email less LOL.

  • Sam S - 4 years ago

    Yes and not a plugin feature. I think this requires some minor code alteration that is a logical adaption to Wordpress as is. Also this is not that big a deal anyway.

    I feel that if wordpress could check to compatibility of themes & plugins used - that would be awesome. This of course would require lots of extra thought and is perhaps unworkable - how easy is rolling back upgrades?

    lots of people are still using wp 2.7.x -2.9.x AFAIS

  • Alastair - 4 years ago

    Yes and no. It'd be pretty neat but I think most Wordpress users know when there's an update available and don't need to be notified. If the users don't update immediately it's probably one of three things:
    a) The auto update NEVER works and manual update is a pain, so they push the update further down the line.
    b) Plugins don't work properly with the latest version.
    c) Update takes many hours I don't have. Wait for next iteration.

  • Andrew Nacin - 4 years ago

    @jebb: @Tech163: This isn't designed for you -- you're both an exception, as am I. That's also why there would probably be an option.

    We wouldn't add an option and make it default to off -- if it's important enough for core, it's important enough to be off by default.

  • Alex M. (Viper007Bond) - 4 years ago

    On by default but the ability to turn it off. My blog updates hourly, I don't need e-mails. :)

  • Tech163 - 4 years ago

    I say no. I have about 20 WP blogs, and it'd be a pain to turn them off one by one. If you "really" want to put them, perhaps make it default to not send email.

  • JM - 4 years ago

    The option would be the best move. Some of us are constantly observing other mediums of communication (aka Twitter) and typically see new information there first.

  • Pablo Almeida - 4 years ago

    I think that each user should choose the best option for him reality. The user experiente begins with liberty! ;)

  • Ayush - 4 years ago

    Always.. whenever anything is created in this cyber world, it is always appreciated if the end user is given the choice to choose to use it or not..

  • mhnassif - 4 years ago

    yes, please also include update release notes.

  • Matthew Muro - 4 years ago

    I think this is a really good idea. The goal here is to hit the low hanging fruit, the majority of users who aren't admins for 30+ sites.

    I'd really like to see this extended to plugins & themes as well. I would suggest a 'Notifications' screen where you can turn any of them on/off. Being able to hook your plugin or theme into a Notifications API would be nice, too.

  • Oscar Marcelo - 4 years ago

    Yes, if we have a setting to turn in on/off and if you include in the email the complete/major changelog with something like "Why you should upgrade". ;)

  • steve - 4 years ago

    would have to have one hell of an easy 'turn this off' switch

  • Kevin - 4 years ago

    Plugins for this have already been written.

    We've had to justifiably not upgrade one of our mu servers to 3.x yet because of compatibility problems with key plugins. We are working diligently to solve this problem, including contacting both core and plugin developers, even providing them with the code at issue. But they have refused to address the bugs, even the core team. So we're left with the decision to run with a known but older codebase for now, or run a modified and unsupported core and plugins.

    Mandatory email nags on top of that would be incredibly annoying.

  • Mark Kenny - 4 years ago

    Hell, no. If you have more than one site you'd get tons of the same email. And there's enough warnings and notifications anyway.

    If you do implement this, switch it off by default, or give an option during install or something.

  • Ipstenu - 4 years ago

    I vote yes, and for MultiSite I would say that the SITE Admin (Super Grover, whatever) would get the email. The person in charge of the whole shebang.

    That said, I think 'Yes, but with an option to turn off...' would also be good.

  • Michael Fields - 4 years ago

    I voted 'no' because in all honesty this would be annoying to me. I generally know when an update is approaching and feel that the notice in the administration panels is sufficient. However, if I had a second chance to vote, I would choose 'yes'. I believe that email notifications would benefit the majority of users - especially those who have WordPress installed on their site but rarely log in. IMO this should be included in core. Even if it may be annoying to some users (myself included), the amount of installations that it could potentially protect is well worth it in my book.

  • Randy - 4 years ago

    Sounds like plugin territory to me.

  • Michael - 4 years ago

    What also hasn't been discussed is multi-site installations. Again, it's not uncommon for the individual to have their email address for the site admin. I wouldn't want 500+ people getting this email and then contacting me. As it is, I hide the message from the dashboard.

  • Will Anderson - 4 years ago

    Sorry to spam this poll, but...

    Another way this could be made less of a pain would be if the email only went out x days after a release (how long to wait should, again, be customisable either through the UI or a filter). That way you can offer that gentle nudge to people who don't visit their wp-admin very often without annoying those who do.

  • rob - 4 years ago

    Yes, this is cool. But remove the notification from the admin. That worries clients.

  • Andy Hoyland - 4 years ago

    I've got to agree with Jebb and then Will.

    I am admin on many installations of WP - so the need to turn the feature off (and actually default to off would be better for me!) would be essential and so feel it should be a plugin.

    I reckon it would be a useful plugin though - especially for people with maybe only one install who don't access it all the time. I know a few people who ignore the message to upgrade the way it is at the moment - a friendly email reminding them to upgrade would go down well.

  • Will Anderson - 4 years ago

    So what if I deploy a site for a client, but use their email address as the main site email (which is not uncommon). Then at 3 in the morning I get a call from the client telling me they got an email saying they needed to upgrade their blog, and wondering if I could take care of it.

    I can see this feature being useful, but it needs to be something you can turn off during the install process, and it should use a custom (or at least customisable) email address.

  • Winning Inch - 4 years ago

    It be great to get an alert as it allows us to plan the upgrade for each client and to give them advance notice.. Plus it gives us a heads up to to test or enhance custom themes. But the ability to turn it off would be good.

  • Ben Huson - 4 years ago

    I think this is a good idea and for the majority of users should be on by default (rather that as a plugin) as I think it important to notify the majority of users that they should upgrade.

    However, as I manage many blogs for clients I wouldn't want to receive 30 emails every time a new version was released, so there would have to be an option to disable. I think there should probably be an option in the admin but potentially it could also be done via a hook/filter and released as a plugin I guess.

  • jebb - 4 years ago

    eyh, i've got 50+ selfhosted wordpress-sites, and no; i do not want 50+ mails everytime i need to upgrade...

  • Jane Wells - 4 years ago

    @S: For self-hosted (.org) sites. "We" wouldn't email them, technically, the application would send an email to the address listed in settings when it received an automated update notice.

  • Jenni - 4 years ago

    S, obviously it's for people who have installed WordPress & not WordPress.com users.

    You've already given your email address, look under 'Settings'.

    The whole point is so that if you don't log into your admin panel much, or you have WordPress installed in multiple places, you'll remember to keep all installs updated thanks to a reminder email.

  • Will Anderson - 4 years ago

    If enough people say "I want to be able to turn it off", I'd argue it should be implemented as a plugin, not a core feature.

  • Scott Hampton - 4 years ago

    .com or .org? I like the way it works with my .org self-hosted website. A little notation in my dashboard.

  • msakr - 4 years ago

    @S

    I suppose it'll query the admins of the site, an email them all. Or if its a setting, you can just choose which admins to notify when its time.

  • Kurt Milam - 4 years ago

    Yes, please! At least add an option that allows admins to request an email when it's time to update.

    We run and host multiple sites for customers, and I'd prefer to be notified immediately when an update is available.

    Kurt

  • S - 4 years ago

    This is for whom? WordPress.com users? I think WordPress.com blogs get updated automatically!

    WordPress users? They already get the message in the backend. And how would you get access to their email IDs?

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