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What would you do at this point?

Posted 6 years.

5 Comments

  • Howard Peters - 6 years ago

    I concur with Kay Scanlon.

  • Nancy Brue - 6 years ago

    I am a vestibular therapist who also sees orthopedic patients. Our staff is also familiar with asking the questions of when did your dizziness begin and what provokes it? If I have any kind of referral for cervical injury or cervicogenic dizziness, I screen for possible vestibular problems. if they are a new onset with treatment, I screen for instability, VBI and migraine. notifying the doctor and quick referral to a vestibular therapist can save the patient a lot of misery with dizziness and nausea.

  • Nancy Brue - 6 years ago

    I am a vestibular therapist who also sees orthopedic patients. Our staff is also familiar with asking the questions of when did your dizziness begin and what provokes it? If I have any kind of referral for cervical injury or cervicogenic dizziness, I screen for possible vestibular problems. if they are a new onse with treatment, I screen for instability, VBI and migraine. notifying the doctor and quick referral to a vestibular therapist can save the patient a lot of misery with dizziness and nausea.

  • MIchele Laube - 6 years ago

    I see this all the time. Once I have cleared the neck for any instabilty I would test for BPPV.

  • Kay Scanlon - 6 years ago

    I would like to gather more information, if for no other reason than to provide her PCP with specifics. Does this only happen with position changes? How long does it last? Was this present immediately following the accident and has it worsened or improved. How often does this happen? Were open mouth films obtained after the accident. Depending upon the response to these questions, I would contact her PCP.

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